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All "Senior Health & Wellbeing" Articles

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Managing Mobility Problems in Seniors
Problems associated with aging can affect a person’s ability to move around, or mobility.
5 Tips for Living Well with Type 2 Diabetes
We've gathered some tips and resources for aging individuals living with type 2 diabetes to help them maintain physical and mental well-being.
The Respiratory System: Age-Related Changes & COPD
The respiratory system, like many of the other human systems (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive), is a wondrously complex and sophisticated arrangement of organs working together to maintain homeostasis.
Keeping Seniors Safe in the Bathroom
Bathrooms can be quite hazardous ─ especially for seniors. Bathrooms typically have slippery surfaces, and nothing dependable to grasp in order to prevent falls.
Elderly Home Care and Depression
It is important to recognize depression symptoms when caring for an elderly loved one. While seniors aging in their own home can help them maintain their independence, it can also be isolating.
Diabetes Prevention and Care
Half of all Americans age 65 or older have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.
Pneumonia in Seniors: Prevention and Treatments
Pneumonia is an infection that affects one or both lungs. The disease can range from mild to severe, and can be fatal.
What Does a Heart Attack Look Like?
Most of us have a specific idea of what a heart attack looks like: someone feels an abrupt, strong pain that causes them to stop in their tracks and clutch their chest.
Living with Arthritis
One in five adults suffer from arthritis, and the majority of these are seniors. For older adults to understand the stages of living with arthritis, it’s helpful to talk about how the disease is identified, diagnosed and managed.
Seniors and Kitchen Safety: Tips for the
What's considered a primary gathering place in the home can become a nightmare for seniors. People age 65 and older have a 2.5 times greater risk of dying in a kitchen fire than the general population. When's the last time you looked for potential hazards
Monday, September 21, 2015

Food-borne bacteria usually take one to three days to cause illness but in some cases, depending on the bacteria, as little as 30 minutes to as many as three weeks. Symptoms of food poisoning may include upset stomach, abdominal pain, vomiting or diarrhea. Flu-like symptoms with a fever, headache and body aches also are possible. At times, it can be confused with other types of illness.

The National Institutes of Health recommends the following if you suspect you have contracted a food-borne illness:

  • Contact your doctor or health care provider and seek medical treatment as necessary.
  • Save the food in question, wrap it securely, clearly label it and freeze it. It may be used to diagnose your illness and prevent others from getting sick.
  • Save all packaging and record the date and time the food was eaten. Also save unopened packages of the same product. Report the contaminated food to the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-674-6854.
  • Call the local health department if you believe you became ill from food eaten at a local restaurant.



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  • Safety
  • Emergency
  • Food Poisoning